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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
generations calling us apathetic, spoon-fed and directionless, and i went away feeling inspired that our generation, you know, does want to fix this country, does want to fix this world. i don't know if it is going to happen overnight. our world is changing every day. i think the way we communicate, the way we affect change is doing different things. my father and mother who grew up in the 1960's, we are not out there in the streets protesting. we spread information and communication in a much different way. >> where did you grow up? >> i was born in d.c., i grew up in connecticut, went to school in new hampshire. >> what was the atmosphere in your family? what did your parents do? >> my mother was a journalist, she was a science writer. she wrote for the washington post for a number of years. >> what was her name? >> christine heineman. my father worked for general electric, and he now teaches up in boston. >> wasn't his father also well known? i learned this from you, but thousand how did they fit into the path? >> my parents and grandparents are amazing people. i feel very lucky. >> w
were calling us directionless. and i walked away feeling inspired. that our generation does want to fix this country, does want to fix this world. and i don't know if it's going to happen overnight. i think our world is changing every day and i think the way we communicate, the way we effect change is going to be different than my father and my mother who grew up in the 60's. we're not out there in the streets protesting. i think we communicate and spread information in a much different way. >> so where did you grow up? >> i grew up -- i was born in d.c. i grew up in connecticut, went to school in new hampshire. >> what was the atmosphere of your family? what did your parents do? >> my mother was a journalist actually. she was a science writer. she wrote for the "washington post." >> was -- >> christine russell. she kept her maiden name. my dad is a lawyer. he started in the public sector. and then ended his career for 20 years working for general electric. and now teaches up in boston. >> this is the well-known ben hineman. wasn't his father also well known? >> yes. >> explain that. ac
, that is how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story about the atomic bomb? before he became president, and then at the decision was off his desk? it is still a controversial story. i wanted to know more about it. it was a puzzle for me. that is why i chose truman. >> i am going to come back to mr. truman, but it is interesting that this is the first time you have ever been on television. >> i think most people have not been on television, a country of 320 million people, this is my first time. i know, being with you, i will enjoy it. >> the audience needs to know up front that you were married to a man that was on television a lot. >> yes, he was. my wonderful husband, who died three years ago, who wrote, i think, marvelous books and was a great teacher. he was the one on television. i was never on television. >> david herbert donald. a man with three first names. >> except herbert is a family name. his mother was a herbert. his mother loved her side of the family and he wanted to memorialize that side of the family. when he was given the na
and later, a look at cybersecurity threats to the u.s. >> this week on "q&a," former harvard university press editor aida donald discusses her latest book, "citizen soldier, a life of harry s. truman." aida donald, why did you write a book about harry truman? >> i wanted to do another biography, having written about teddy roosevelt six years ago and had great fun writing about him. i looked around for another president that i might enjoy working on for a few years, and i came upon truman, who i remember, i am old enough to remember him. truman had two big puzzles in his life. i said, you really have to write about some of those puzzles. it gives you something to work on, to work through. maybe other biographers, other readers do not know about the puzzles or even see them as puzzles, but you do, and that is how i chose truman and worked very hard on the puzzles which turned out to be very important for his career. it kept me very interested in it this man from the midwest. this man with a high school education who accidentally became president in momentous times in our lives. >> what ar
, october, 1962. all of us wanted to have a good book ready for the fall of 2012. and many of us in the historical community as well as certainly at the library knew that there were these tremendously rich tapes, only a small percentage of which had actually been heard, and that it would be a service to the historical community and to all americans to get the tapes out to the listening public. so the library made the tapes available, but they need add historian to write an introduction and annotate, and so that's where i came in. >> i'm going to run a quick one here. this is from the 1952 senate race. it's not a tape of john f. kennedy, but it's a jingle. let's listen to this. when we vote this november let's all remember let's vote for kennedy make him your selection in the senate election he'll do more for you and me look at kennedy's history you'll see it's no mystery he's your kind of man so do all that you can and vote for kennedy ♪ >> we added the pictures and photographs ourselves. but that's a part of the c.d.'s that you get with the book. >> it is. >> how come that's i
be in politician in a few years, period. >> he's giving us the punctuation. so why is that? >> he's telling her how to arrange the sentences, because he wanted his secretary to type it. it did appear in "politics u.s.a." the journalist, james cannon, edited that book. it's a fascinating moment because he's thinking autobiographically. he's still a young man, he's running for president, but he's had a pretty rich life already. and his life included certainly his world war ii service, and he's talking there about coming out of the war. interestingly talks about being out of sorts. didn't really know what to do as a veteran coming back and then began getting interested in politics. but he had seen a lot of the world. he lived in england. at the time england was veering very rapidly towards a world war with germany. he had been at the u.n. conference in san francisco. seen a lot of the world and is beginning to put down his thoughts. i think the whole reason he installed the taping system was as a historian's helper, that he was beginning to think about the memoirs he would someday right. it was only h
a copy of the biography and read it and thought, i think i can do better than this. >> give us a brief synopsis of seward's live. >> he is born in new york. not new york city. the rural new york in 1801. he studies law, becomes a lawyer, settles in auburn, new york. this is halfway between albany and buffalo. the day he starts practicing law, he starts practicing politics. he is elected governor of new york in 1888. he is elected to the federal senate in 1869. 1860, he is the favorite for the republican nomination but does not get it. he instead becomes secretary of state under lincoln and served eight years as secretary of state. he retired, travels and on the world, and died in 1872. >> his wife, and daughter, died young. what were the circumstances and years? >> his wife was in ill health through much of the latter part of her life. she is roughly seward's age. she is summoned by the family from auburn, new york, where she spends most of the civil war years, down to washington after the carriage accident. she tends to her husband after the carriage accident. she is there on that ter
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)